Tag Archives: Michael Hadani

Bank of America Shareholder Meeting – A Failure

The Bank of America Board of Directors was on the defensive yesterday. There were protestors gathered outside the annual general meeting; security was high; inside, the mood was testy. In his opening remarks, Chairman of the Board Chad Holliday flubbed an announcement about question and answer time, prompting a shareholder to interrupt the preliminaries; and when Q & A on shareholder resolutions began in earnest, CEO Brian Moynihan stuck to terse, one-sentence, boilerplate answers to most questions, until one stockholder stood up and asked for “more nuance and explanation” and “a more thoughtful response” to the owners’ questions. General applause ensued, but the dialogue did not really improve. In that respect, the meeting felt like a lost opportunity: the Board simply refused to engage.

There were six shareholder resolutions but (as the Q & A revealed) really just three big issues on shareholders’ minds: executive compensation, predatory mortgage and lending practices, and political contributions.

One shareholder seemed to sum up the feelings of many in the room when he said that “it’s a comedy” to be a Bank of America shareholder, given the gap between the stock’s performance and the compensation of its executives. Several people directly asked Brian Moynihan to forgo (or, as one shareholder put it, “deny”) his raise for the coming year. This came to a head in an exchange with one shareholder, who said that the issue really came down to where Moynihan’s “heart” is. “Do you love your neighbor as yourself? Are you going to turn down your raise?” Like a boy at his catechism, Moynihan parsed the question and said that he had been raised to love his neighbor as he loves himself (how could he say otherwise?), but when it comes to turning down his raise the answer is simply “no”; and then he repeated a few prepared phrases about how his own compensation is “aligned” with the Bank’s strategic goals. That was his gospel.

Still, shareholders urged the bank to consider the “injustice” in the world, and Bank of America’s part in it. Activist shareholder Dawn Dannenbring (whose appearance at a JP Morgan shareholder meeting I blogged about here) asked the Board to think about why they need to have heightened security at their shareholder meetings: “If you were a better corporate neighbor,” she remarked, “you wouldn’t have to be so scared.” To charges that it had “decimated” the communities where it did business, the Bank responded with a bland assertion: “the success of communities is equal to our success”; at one point Moynihan even muttered the phrase “good for America,” but it sounded as if he had never really warmed to that talking point, and his voice trailed off.

Some tried to appeal to the bank’s business sense: if Bank of America is seen “not as part of the solution but as causing the problem,” it runs a “reputational risk.” That’s putting it mildly. Others were not so restrained: “You’ve got to stop foreclosing on families,” exclaimed one shareholder; and a number of people rose during the Q & A and told their own stories about how the bank – their bank – had ruined them. Moynihan was patient and even compassionate with these share-owning customers, and told them they could talk to a B of A “teammate” on the spot, that very day, about their problems. But the crowd was repeatedly reminded that these individual cases – their own cases or the cases of family and friends – did not bear on the proposals they had assembled to vote on. This was a myopic response at best, as if behind each of these proposals there were not thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of individual stories that need to be told, and that make up the big picture of the bank’s role in America.

While the bank is reluctant to open a dialogue on its role in society, it is aggressive in its bid for political power and social influence. And in the wake of Citizens United, the battle lines around political spending are being drawn. A proposal to prohibit all political spending from the corporate treasury – which I wrote about in a previous post — received just 4 percent of the vote, but the resolution still counts as an important first step. Another political spending proposal, requiring Bank of America to disclose all grassroots lobbying, fared much better, garnering about 30 percent of the vote (right around the 32.73 percent it gained last year).

Calls for disclosure of political spending are getting harder to ignore. And though prohibitions and other checks on spending still face an uphill battle, the resolution to stop political spending at least gave shareholders a chance to say a few words about the risks and uncertain outcomes of profligate political spending. Shareholders cited research (by Hadani and others) to support their position; but it is hard to say whether this made any impression whatsoever on the Board. If so, they weren’t going to let it show. They just seemed to want to get the whole thing over with. They had not come to deliberate, or listen or learn. They had come to defend. And that is why the 2012 Bank of America shareholders’ annual meeting should be reckoned a failure.

Can CEOs Ever Get The Political Fix They Need?

There have recently been plenty of shareholder proposals asking companies to disclose political spending. In fact (as noted in an earlier post), the share of proposals to the Fortune 100 focusing on political spending increased 84 percent in 2011 from the three previous years. Last week, to mark the second anniversary of the Citizens United decision (on January 17th), Trillium Asset Management and Green Century Funds took things up a notch.

Urging “corporate leaders to heed the call of shareholders and citizens,” the two social investment firms filed shareholder resolutions at Bank of America, 3M, and Target Corporation asking those companies to stop political spending altogether. This was the first time institutional shareholders have formally asked corporations to refrain from political spending.

The chances of these resolutions winning approval are slim to none, of course – at least right now. The hope is that over time support will build around these proposals, until they reach a threshold where boards of directors can no longer ignore them. (That’s around 30 percent of shareholder approval.) That day seems a long way off. Still, a slim chance is better than no chance, and — let’s face it — there is simply no chance of legislative remedies to Citizens United, especially from the current Congress, and definitely not in an election year.

“We now have an entitled class of Wall Street financiers and of corporate CEOs who believe the government is there to do… whatever it takes in order to keep the game going and their stock price moving upward,” David Stockman tells Bill Moyers in an interview that will air this weekend. “As a result,” Stockman says, “we have neither capitalism nor democracy. We have crony capitalism.”

That sounds about right, though I would ask whether Stockman and others who take this view have really put their finger on what’s novel or unique about the present moment. Entitlement and cronyism are not exactly new in America; some would say the game has been rigged all along.

But that’s a historical discussion. The more pressing question is one these new shareholder resolutions would have us address. Is corporate political activity good for business? Is the corporate plan to capture government sound? Are corporations really getting what they pay for? Can those entitled CEOs and Wall St. financiers win the game, or are there rules to the game they don’t understand? In other words, how well does crony capitalism work? Those broad questions frame the question posed in the title of this post.

There’s some compelling evidence to suggest that corporate political activity is not only bad for democracy but also bad for business. The Trillium and Green Century announcements cite the research of Michael Hadani, who sets out to “question the standard narrative that political spending is an unmitigated good for firms.” Hadani, a Professor of Management at Long Island University, concludes that despite spending extravagant amounts of money – AT&T, for instance, “officially” spent over 219 million dollars between 1998 and 2008 “on achieving political success” (and that was before Citizens United!) — corporations are not achieving the political outcomes they want.

What’s worse, corporate political activity generally does not appear to increase shareholder value.

This chart tracks a negative correlation between firm market value and PAC activity:


And that is just one lens. The research Hadani presents tells a pretty consistent story: the profligate pursuit of illusory goods, usually without the requirement to disclose where the money goes, or what companies and their investor-owners get for it (apart from heightened risk and reduced transparency). It should therefore alarm all shareholders – not just socially-conscious ones — that Citizens United makes it possible for executives to plunder the corporate treasury in pursuit of those same uncertain ends, without any limits or any real accountability. A new kind of barbarian may already be inside the gates: the CEO in search of the ever-elusive political fix.